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Suku Ini Doyan Makan Otak Manusia, Begini Efeknya pada tubuh mereka




all countries want to meet the health and medical needs of their populations, preferably without bankrupting themselves or draining resources that serve other important human needs and purposes. In the face of varied economic, political, cultural, environmental, epidemiologic, and demographic forces, each country tries to tailor its health care system to the specific characteristics and needs of its population. Yet the building blocks are largely the same: every country requires a basic public health infrastructure, which in developing countries may rely heavily on community health workers. Developed countries require physicians, nurses, and other health care professionals, hospitals and clinics, and some way to pay both for clinical services and for drugs, medical devices, and other interventions. Countries need ways to measure the effectiveness of the care provided, in order to improve and regulate it and to ensure the care is meeting the demand. They need ways to evaluate treatments and health care interventions and ways to disseminate them. They need ways to educate clinicians about health and medicine, as well as ways to educate everyone else, to help their populations lead healthy lives, make wise health care decisions, and participate in their own care. And with health care costs ranging from about 2% to more than 17% of GDP, they need ways to pay for it all. During the U.S. health care reform debate leading up to the passage of the Affordable Care Act, health policy approaches used in other high-income countries were sometimes cited either as models to be emulated or as cautionary tales — and occasionally both. In truth, most effective national health care systems have had both successes and failures and have continued to shift and change, whether through reasoned evolution or owing to the swing of a political or economic pendulum. In many cases, lessons can be drawn from failures and setbacks as well as from advances and successes. Useful and impressively cost-effective solutions may sometimes come from lower-income countries that have had to innovate to make fewer resources go farther. Some national health policymakers may find surprisingly applicable approaches in countries whose cultural and political assumptions differ markedly from their own. Even struggling health care systems may have a few hidden gems that can inspire broadly productive changes. With this issue of the Journal, we are launching a series of Perspective articles on the health care systems of selected countries around the world beginning with Sweden.1 Working with the Commonwealth Fund, a private foundation whose international program in health policy supports its mission of promoting high-performing health care systems in the United States and elsewhere, the Journal has commissioned articles on health policies in place or under development in Europe, Asia, North America, South America, Africa, and Australasia. Each article will present one or several aspects of a national health care system, chosen by the authors as distinctive, new, innovative, or potentially instructive for other countries. To facilitate comparisons among countries, each entry in the series will include two brief case studies, following two typical patients through the country's system — one a young, pregnant woman, the other a middle-aged man with a myocardial infarction. In addition, each piece will include a table covering a set of key system parameters. That information will also be used to construct an interactive graphic that permits specific international comparisons.2 As the article series builds, so will the breadth and complexity of the graphic. The Journal has long recognized that medicine is universal: although different countries and regions have different disease burdens, the fruits of biomedical research span borders, offering similar benefits (and posing similar risks) to all peoples. And indeed, the Journal has readers and contributors in all parts of the world. We believe that an international approach to our exploration of health policy can enlighten physicians, policymakers, health care administrators, and the wider public and can provide fodder for more thoughtful policy and delivery-system reforms as each country strives to achieve better and more equitable health outcomes at an affordable price. the cheapest car insurance cost of car insurance best car insurance quotes insurance auto insurance quotes car get car insurance quotes online car insurance agent instant car insurance quote car insurance webisite direct car insurance insure a car motor car insurance quotes cheap car insurance online quotes for car insurance car insurance commercial car insurance motor insurance quote car insurance quotes online get a quote online international healty insurance compare car insurance quotes credit card with cashback credit card reader credit card instant approval online applay credit card bad credit credit card credit card selection online visa card pay with credit card credit card charges visa or mastercard credit card machine applay a credit card small business credit cards prepaid debit card visa debit card alone credit card credit card terminal card credit application credit card generator credit card balance credit card numbers credit card tansfer credit card interest rates credit card interest rate gold card credit card online best rate credit cards credit card low interest visa card online online credit card how to applay a credit card a interest credit cards debit card

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